Cricut Wild Card 2, Graphic 45 Anchor Card

You Are My Anchor

SAMSUNG CSCPaper Line: Graphic 45, By the Sea, 12×12 SAMSUNG CSC

SAMSUNG CSC

I ADORE this Graphic 45 cardstock!

And this card from Cricut Wild Card 2!

For the “rope” attached to the anchor, I used paper-backed canvas which I die-cut on my Cricut Explore. Then, I inked it using Tim Holtz Distress Ink in Antique Linen. Actually, I just rubbed it across the ink pad.

And here is a little secret; I scanned in the sheet with the cut-outs and opened the file in Corel Paintshop Pro x7 Ultimate to create a path for the circle (inside card) and saved it as a PNG so that I could upload it into Cricut Design Space. Then, I utilized the Print then Cut feature so that I could cut a perfect circle at the size I needed.

Advertisements

Die Cut Bookmarks, Cricut Explore

IMG_1582

Very intricate die-cuts. It was kind of a pain to get all the little pieces out but, the Cricut Explore did an awesome job cutting.

Cricut Explore Print Then Cut

I am totaling diggin’ my new Cricut Explore! Especially, the Print Then Cut feature. Without a subscription, I only have a few of the Printable images and before I invest more money… I gotta Play before I Pay!

So, I found out that you can take any of the Cut Files, you know, the ones that cut in layers, and FLATTEN them, which makes them a printable image! Whaaaat? YES! And you can change the colors before you cut to match your project. AND you can also cut layers with those!

Currently (still), I am making things for my Niece who is expecting her first child in January. Her color theme is Turquoise and Coral. LOVE that combo, BTW. Anyway, this is a simple gift bag that the butterfly adds just the right amount of dimension.

IMG_1525.JPG

The butterfly is from the Rock Princess cartridge. And, as I said, I flattened it to make it a printable image. I did separate those layers so that I could give it dimension using Pop Dots.

IMG_1524.JPG

Yay, Cricut Explore!

Cricut Design Space Update

Coming in January, an update for the iPad App. Right now, you can only use the app for Make it Now projects. Soon, you’ll be able to do it all from your iPad. This is exciting!

Design Space App Update

Spooky Story and Good Witch Apothecary Bottles

For Halloween, we always set out to scare the kiddos. Each year we out-do ourselves by taking things to a whole new level. ..more zombies, more blood, more creepy ghouls hiding in the bushes. However, the star of our show is always our life-sized, talking, motorized spooky butler, Jeeves.

This year, Jeeves was especially spooky when my husband plugged the cord into his back, yet had not plugged him into an outlet, and out of his mouth came the oh-so familiar words “Ahhh, more guests. Please leave your bodies at the door and do come in.” Since I look forward to this each year, I smiled at Jeeves and patted him on the head. That’s when I noticed my husband’s eyeballs; they were HUGE! Then, I watched him, power cord in hand, pull the plug from good ol’ Jeeves. He was never connected to the electrical outlet. And, he does not use batteries. Nor is there any way to charge him. We’ve had him for years and that had never happened. Creepy factor at 11!

So, when I was working on my Witch Apothecary bottles, not really knowing how I wanted to grunge them up, I thought about Jeeves and chose to make them witchy shabby chic instead.Witch Apothecary BottlesI used my Cricut Explore with the Write then Cut feature. The paper is from the Chalkboard Stack by DCWV and I used the silver metallic marker for the font image. To test out my new sticker paper by Cricut, I made it slightly larger than the black cardstock. The eye and mouse (AKA, baby rat) were purchased from Spirit Halloween store. The toadstool, I made using Sculpey polymer clay in brown. Why brown? Because, honestly, I was thinking of mushrooms. Duh!  When paint wasn’t working, I grabbed my Inka Gold in Antique Silver and Lava Red. It worked beautifully. The toadstool spots are dimensional using Super Heavy Gesso.

Bakers twine, silk sari ribbon and tulle were used around the neck of the bottles.